Nailing your Interview! 7 Tips to get you Hired!

Nailing an interview can be scary, but they don’t have to be. Here are 7 tips to help you get hired!

  1. Dress the part

    1. Don’t wear cologne or perfume.
    2. Are you applying for a corporate job? Dress the part. What do you think they would wear. To make it easier, google the workplace and check out pictures of the office or center. The idea behind this is to always dress more appropriately, but not to underdress.
  2. Know your audience

    1. Did you find out the name of the person you are interviewing with? Is it a face to face interview? Phone interview? Skype? or even a group interview?
      1. If so, research who they are. It will help take off the edge if you find out they started at the job you are applying to, or maybe you’ll find out you have something in common with them. It will give you the edge.
  3. Research the company

    1. If you don’t know about the company in which you are applying to, you are wrong. They are fantastic sites that help with learning about a company and what it is like to work for them. One website I recommend is –www.glassdoor.com
    2. Not knowing the company in which you are interviewing with my create a risk. what happens if the company has a strong political stance or endorses a particular candidate? and you don’t agree with them? wouldn’t you want to know that before accepting the position?
  4. Research the job description

    1. Researching the job description will help you better prepare for the interview. You can easily throw in some of the job duties into past work experiences to be more relevant.

  5. Bring your updated resume and references

    1. In my industry, I always see candidates bring a reference page full of friends. This is a big NO. Make your references professional. If you don’t have professional references, go find them. Create a LinkedIn page if you need to.
    2. Another funny thing, I see when interviewing candidates, is old resumes or made on the spot. Make your resume as relevant and new as possible when bringing it to an interview.
    3. They didn’t ask for you to bring a resume? bring it anyway, you will look much more prepared than other candidates.
  6. Bring experiences not experience.

    1. I typically know when I have nailed an interview. When the interviewer asks questions that are relatable to experiences and not my experience is when I do my best. “Describe a difficult time at your past employment and how you resolved it.” as an example.
    2. Show the interviewer you can deal with the duties of the job. Paint the picture for them so they can understand how you would react in certain environments.
    3. These are always changing and can be hard to think of on the spot. Think about tough times at other positions or how you made your past employer more money, created efficiency, why you were promoted, etc.
  7. Always apply

    1. This may sound strange to people, but I say you should always apply to places. You never know what you’ll be offered. The offers you don’t want, you don’t have to take. Always looking up and making upward transitions is the key here. Like I have mentioned before, I am the typical millennial with no job loyalty. If I see a better opportunity for self-growth and development, I will jump on it and so should you. Upward growth is the key to self-development. Always pushing yourself to learn new things and create challenges to overcome them. Strength through adversity.

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What is Failure? Knowing this could change your life.

Failure, failure, failure.

Failure consumes everyone’s life. It finally feels like being part of the trophy-kid generation makes sense. Hear me out.

Most millennials are coined as being the generation that received trophies just for participating. I am not advocating reward for losing.

What I am advocating for is looking past the ideology of failure. I think back to childhood baseball and getting a trophy for showing up. Psychologically, it probably taught me to try things although I wasn’t the best on the team. Because of that, I knew there was a return on trying something I may have failed at otherwise. Is this generation unafraid to try things?

On the hand, this ideology can become toxic. I am not for that.

Failure can be anything.

I didn’t wake up in time, then I snoozed three times this morning.

I failed at this task.

I forgot to eat breakfast as I ran out the door. Another fail.

Failure happens almost every hour for someone and failure has such a bad name.

If you can reflect on these processes, you can start to analyze small microtasks that create a momentum for success. The learning process between analyzing micro-failures sets you up for success.

With that, you can start to break the process of failing and start winning.

My Focus:

When I tell people I am fascinated by failure it freaks them out.

I don’t think they understand it…

When I started to understand it, it created a pivotal moment in my life.

It’s because it took me several years to quit beating myself up for failing at small tasks. For me giving up too easily on risks created a momentous downfall.

I was able to reflect and see the valuable lessons it taught me.

The things I have failed at have taught me valuable lessons, like risk.

This risk is very important in development. Success typically never happens for those who don’t take risks.

Think Gordon Gecko from the Movie Wall Street – Risk equals return.

Companies and people throughout the years may have thought their business would fail. Some familiar faces are Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, etc. All of these people have been rediculed for their failures and were able to turn their companies into greatness. It was learning the failing process and changing the failing perspective that has helped them.

–To learn more about my personal failures and how it helped me become more successful, use the contact form below.

Taking risks and failing teaches us to learn, manage, and react to other failures almost making us more immune to small micro-failures in life.

Like children on the playground, trying new obstacles and failing. It is a critical part of development for children. How to analyze obstacles and how to defeat them after failing. Why, as we get older, do we try new things and give up after not succeeding the clear goal?

It makes you stronger. So stop beating yourself up for trying something new and not being good at it. Reflect and learn.

Change your perspective.

Here is the failing model:

1. Take risks

2. Succeed/Fail

3. Learn/Reflect

4. Try again and crush it

5. Keep the momentum

6. Succeed

By using this failing model, you can the process going to succeed. Success is not instant. It takes time and it takes failure. Sometimes we are lucky and success just happens.

If it doesn’t, follow the failing model.

Photo from: http://playthinklearn.net/some-thoughts-on-failure-and-learning/

Read this book to help with exercises on changing your perspective on failure: