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5 Reasons Why You’ll Never Be a Prophet in your Hometown

I picture this.. 20 years after graduating from high school, I go to attend my high school reunion. People are exactly what I expected, mostly overweight, hair is falling out, the alcoholism got most of them, and a quarter of them are successful doctors drowning in student debt.

I show up.. I am in shape, took care of myself, obtained a Ph.D., wrote a number of books, own businesses, run online businesses, and basically have a typical out of a magazine lifestyle. (Optimism)

Imagine that these people haven’t heard about you in years or even seen you. All they can remember is you were the class clown in school and somewhat of an outcast. How could he become something great?

Here are my 5 thoughts on why you’ll never be a prophet in your hometown.

  1. People can’t get out of their head who you were before your success
  2. People are willing to support false idols over you
  3. They are jealous of what you may accomplish
  4. You will still never be better than them
  5. You are who you were as a child/teen

It feels like starting your own makeup line that sources from Kylie Jenner’s supplier. It’s the same product but one comes from Kylie Brand, people would still buy from Kylie. Why is that? is it the wow factor? or trust factor?

I recently started a small batch coffee company (www.philosocoffee.com) and used my personal Instagram to do some market research. I asked very simple questions like, “who likes coffee?” “who likes philosophy?”  and the funny thing is, I did some shameless marketing, and asked, “who will help support me?” What I found out, was that people would either skip this question or simply put no. I barely had any yes answers. It made me wonder… Do the people I grew up with dislike me? are they over hearing about all of the things I am doing? or are they jealous?

Why would people go and buy mega corporate Starbucks Coffee at 7 dollars a cup and not my entire bag for 10? Why wouldn’t they support me? I know it sounds selfish, but typically when I see friends starting businesses in my old hometown, I try to support them if I can. I want to see my friends become successful.

What did I do wrong? Why was I unsuccessful at intriguing anyone to ask any questions about it? Not that I am owed that from anyone, I just thought it was interesting that no one cared about a friend starting a business. Should we go about our lives just working that terrible 9-5, pay 30% in taxes, drive a SUV, have kids, grow old, and die? Should we never take any risks?

Is it sad that I have never wanted that? a normal life? It sounds so terribly boring to me. I want freedom. The freedom to do what I want, when I want. I think entrepreneurship could be the answer to that and more directly; risk.

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